Thursday, July 29, 2010

Book Review: The Second Savior, by Mark Bouton

The Second Savior (An LAPD Mystery), by Mark Bouton

Hardcover: 267 pages 
Publisher: Five Star (ME); 1 edition (July 17, 2009) 
ISBN-10: 1594147663 
Rating (1 to 5 *): *****

The Second Savior Book Review

Listen to a discussion with author Mark Bouton about this book on BlogTalk radio!

Working in gangland is often referred to as working on the front lines. When reading The Second Savior, by Mark Bouton, it’s easy to see why. Within the first few pages, the reader is a witness to a drive-by shooting, where two cops get caught in the wrong place at the wrong time when approaching a gang member just as his rivals come by to take him out. Their lives are saved when a workman who happened to be laying bricks nearby throws himself into them to knock them out of the way and catches some lead in the process.

The two cops, Dover and Falcon, are thrown head-first into the murder investigation, along with another particularly nasty one that appears to be the work of a jilted lover. The two murders represent opposite ends of the spectrum: one from a world of elegance, one from the mean streets. Through both, the reader is treated to a look at what the lives are like for officers like Dover and Falcon.

The Second Savior is a harsh story with realistic violence, but it is told through the experiences of two good cops who are just trying to survive their daily jobs while serving the community and getting killers off the streets. They are human, with their own failings, just like the rest of us, but they are doing the best they can—and they are good at their jobs.

Mark Bouton’s use of street language lends authenticity to the story, as does his very evident level of experience and knowledge of gang activity, homicide investigation and the lives of inner city cops. His many years in the FBI have given him a great foundation for writing crime books, and his ability to tell a story makes them fun to read—even though I don’t normally choose this type of book to read. As for the significance of the title, I’ll let readers discover that by reading the book.

Thanks to Mark Bouton, who provided a complimentary review copy of this book for review.

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